Historic Miami Beach hotel to be demolished, city says

0

The historic Deauville Beach Resort in Miami Beach will be demolished after the city’s building official issued a final demolition permit on Wednesday.

The shuttered hotel, located at 6701 Collins Ave., will be destroyed by implosion and conventional demolition, according to a Thursday memo from City Manager Alina Hudak to the City Commission. No demolition date has been announced.

The hotel’s owners, the Meruelo family, submitted an engineering report recommending the demolition of the structure before the start of hurricane season in June. The building, which hosted the Beatles in 1964, has been closed since sustaining electrical fire damage in 2017. It has racked up $2.3million in fines from the city for not not having maintained a historic property.

If the building is demolished, Miami Beach code allows the Historic Preservation Board to require replication of the original structure and to order that the new building be the same height and density as the previous structure.

The permit approval came days after Judge Michael Hanzman, who is overseeing a lawsuit the city has brought against the hotel’s owners for failing to bring it up to code, denied the city’s request. to carry out an independent inspection of the building. Building official Ana Salgueiro ordered the demolition in January after inspecting the property with a team of experts, but conservators and some commissioners demanded a second opinion.

After Hanzman’s decision, the permit was approved on Wednesday. The final demand was for the Deauville owners to pay the required fee of $93,777, which they did on Wednesday.

The Miami Design Preservation League, a Miami Beach preservation group, challenged Salgueiro’s commission to Miami-Dade County. If the appeal is successful, the order could be invalidated, Hudak wrote in the memo.

Martin Vassolo covers Miami Beach politics and government for the Miami Herald. He started working for the Herald in January 2018 after attending the University of Florida, where he served as editor of The Independent Florida Alligator. Previously, he was a general duty reporter at the Herald’s subway counter and a political reporting intern.

Share.

Comments are closed.